H. Douglas Sewell

Senior Instructor

PhD - Education

University of Leeds, UK

MA TESOL

University of Birmingham, UK

BSc Biochemistry and Genetics

University of British Columbia

Contact information

Location

Main Campus : EDT604

Research and Scholarly Activity

Research areas

  • Academic and Intellectual Engagement
  • English as a Foriegn Language (EFL)
  • Post-secondary Student Learning and Development
  • Teacher Education
  • Language Assessment

Activities

Dr. Sewell is interested in how students develop and adapt their approaches towards their studies to become more successful learners. This research includes investigating aspects such as learner autonomy, motivation, and Self-Regulation of Learning (SRL) processes. Such SRL processes can include ones such as goal setting, self-monitoring, self-evaluations, attributions and strategic adaptation.

With a background in language teaching, Dr. Sewell also has a research interest in language assessment and specifically how such assessments can be designed to promote more effective approaches to language learning.


Biography

Dr. Sewell was born and grew up in Vancouver BC. He completed his BSc in Biology at the University of British Columbia and then went to South Korea to teach English for one year. Seventeen years later after also having lived in China, Dubai and the UK, he returned to Canada to teach at the University of Calgary.


Publications

Effect of Goal Quality on Subsequent Self-regulation of Learning. (2015) Presentation accepted for the 2015 IATEFL Conference, Manchester, UK.

An Analysis of Self-Regulation of Language Learning in a Middle Eastern Context. (2014) Presentation given at the 2014 TESOL Arabia Conference, Dubai, U.A.E.

Speaking test anxiety among Korean university students. New Directions in Language Assessment. (2011) British Council Access English, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Techniques for conducting effective undergraduate movie English classes. Association of Multimedia-Assisted Language Learning 2009 Conference Proceeding. (2009) Seoul, South Korea.

Utilizing the Expectancy-Value Model of Motivation to better understand poorly motivated false beginner Korean college students. (2008) Studies in Foreign Language Education, 22(1), pp. 379-409.